I’m starting to see that writing, at least the kind that hypnotizes me to sit still instead of going out has been written over a long period of time. It came in bursts and needed to be polished again and again, because the result was worth it. I also realize that I’m too impatient sometimes with this process and I end up with stillborn. 

It’s sad and comforting to read so many stillborn writings here on tumblr, because they reveal to me what I shouldn’t publish and yet I feel sorry for wasted talent and there are those whose writings just make me salivate with envy…

I just hope I have actually learned my lesson this time…

Fluff rice with a fork, never stir it with a spoon.
Vaseline is the best night time eye cream on the market.
You can buy alcohol and chips with your parents’ gas station credit cards.
If you force something, you’ll break it. That could be good or bad.
It’s important to read the care tags on your clothing and follow those instructions.
Related: don’t wash and dry j. crew wool sweaters.
Changing your car’s oil is not optional.
Whatever physical objects you acquire you will one day have to put into a box and move.
You’re allowed to disagree with negative feedback.
It’s always worth reading the instruction manual.
Nostalgia, like any drug, can be a poison or a remedy.
Pets are like human friends but better in every conceivable way.
Good doctors listen more than they talk.
You can’t fix a burned roux.
Floss.
Just because someone is an authority figure does not mean they are intelligent/competent/right.
Measure twice, cut once.
Get your nice jeans and dress pants tailored by a professional.
If you’re uncomfortable wearing it you will not look good.
You’re not required to drink alcohol while in a bar.
There are a few things that cure all ills: the beach, your favorite album on vinyl, and fresh garlic.
Kindness is not weakness.
Baking soda is not baking powder.
Taking Excedrin P.M. while still in public is not advisable.
Terrible people will succeed. Wonderful people will fail. The world is not fair.
Appropriate footwear is always key.
You can absolutely be too forgiving.
Real humor punches up, not down.
Reading the assigned chapters will actually help you learn the material.
There are no adults. Everyone is as clueless as you are.
Applying eyeliner well is a timeless art.
You can always leave. Awkward dates, suffocating jobs, hometowns that you outgrow, relationships that aren’t growing in the right direction.
You can always come home again.
But it won’t be the same.
Life is too short for bad books, boring movies, shitty people, and margarine.
Never underestimate the importance of eyebrows.

36 Things I Wish I Figured Out Sooner - Whitney Kimball  (via seabelle)

my favorites:

Fluff rice with a fork, never stir it with a spoon

You’re allowed to disagree with negative feedback.

Just because someone is an authority figure does not mean they are intelligent/competent/right.

Life is too short for bad books, boring movies, shitty people, and margarine.

You can always come home again. But it won’t be the same.

(via the3volutionofchichi)

storyofalioness:

the-real-goddamazon:

zerostatereflex:

Fertilization

A beautifully done animation on how you became you.

See the full video here as I left out some really cool parts.

From 300 or so million down to ONE.

YOU. MADE. IT.

NIGGA WE MADE IT

Wish they had this in my high school bio class

dope

anarcho-queer:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California
In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.
The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.
Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.”
In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.
Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.
In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today. California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.
Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.”
Credit

and they always get away with it right in your face because we are too busy…

anarcho-queer:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California

In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.

The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.

Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.

In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.

Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.

In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today.

California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.

Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.

Credit

and they always get away with it right in your face because we are too busy…

(via frnklybnjmn)

One cortege of steamboats filled with Congolese missing a hand or both hands, decapitated, riddled with the white man’s diseases, singing haunting, bitter songs to soothe their wounds, went up and down on that Congo river. Day or night a fog would circle their cortege.

In this year 2014, those who venture on the Congo river always take the wrong turn and their boat gets toppled over only to be finally rescued by these restless spirits of men, women and children who lived between 1880 and 1950. They spoke a range of 50 to a hundred dialects, but would quickly oblige to speak with perfect diction your French, Portuguese, German and English. Thanks to the white men they have encountered, they could imitate your laughter, your walk and your bearing and the mundele  of today, versed in political correctness, would feel offended and yet simultaneously thrilled to be aped by these outer worldly men and women.

Their only regrets is that their 3G smartphones weren’t operational to record any of these mind mending experiences, but they also knew that no one would ever believe them even they have been able to bring back proof of their experiences because of technology’s inherent ability to blur the lines between reality and fiction, and that hasn’t included the reliable inconstancy of human testimony.

lauriehalseanderson:

policymic:

Do you still need more proof of rape culture?

As Noam Chomsky once pointed out for Z Magazine, old media types from the institutional bodies like American Enterprise Institute tend to regurgitate the same ideas with a reliability that is equally impressive and infuriating. While assuring the public that rape is a terrible crime, writers like Caroline Kitchens and Heather McDonald of right-wing think tank The Manhattan Institute try to claim that feminists have blown this whole rape culture thing way out of proportion.

Apparently, many women disagree. On Tuesday there were more than 1 million responses on the #RapeCultureIsWhen hashtag started by a frustrated Zerlina Maxwell in response to these right-wing narratives. 

Read moreFollow policymic

Keep speaking up!!!!!

SIGNAL BOOST!!!

(via findyourlovely)

brandibates:

Michaela DePrince

A black angel all dressed in white danced and chased the darkness around her with grace and poise…

(via drmr2314)

bitteroreo:

anastasiajeanettemarie:

sizvideos:

If Girls Hit On Guys Like Guys Hit On Girls - Video

LOOK AT THIS. LOOK AT THIS, MEN WHO DO THIS, AND FEEL FOOLISH

Can we also give a round of applause for them not using AAVE, and promoting the Black Male Rapist stereotype….it could of easily went there in the catcalls, and I appreciate they didn’t.

(via dgusketchbook)

stereoculturesociety:

CultureVIDEO *Soul Train Line Dance* - “Daddy Could Swear” - Gladys Knight & The Pips c. 1973

Black folks in the 70s. Feeling free and gettin’ down. You’re welcome. 

yep

(via drapetomaniakkk)